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    • Atención pediátrica
    • Vacuna

    What You Need to Know About RSV

    Respiratory syncytial virus, also known as RSV, is a common respiratory virus that impacts the lungs and breathing pathways. The virus can be dangerous for infants and young children and is also concerning for older adults. While most older kids and adults only experience cold-like systems and recover in a week or two, an estimated 58,000-80,000 children younger than 5 years old are hospitalized due to RSV each year, and in 2022 healthcare organizations across the country are experiencing higher infection rates than in years past.  "We are experiencing a strong RSV season and do not expect it to go away anytime soon," said Dr. Kris Wilson, Division Chief of Renown Children's Primary Care. "Infants who are infected with RSV almost always show symptoms of runny noses and cough. Call your healthcare provider immediately if your child is having difficulty breathing, is not drinking enough fluids, or is experiencing any worsening of these symptoms.” Symptoms of RSV: Runny nose  Decrease in appetite/inability to drink Dry diapers, an indication of dehydration  Cough, which may progress to wheezing or difficulty breathing Irritability (most common in very young infants) Decreased activity (most common in very young infants) Decreased appetite (most common in very young infants) Apnea, pauses in breathing for more than 10 seconds (most common in very young infants) What to do if you think your child has RSV: Call your pediatrician! If you suspect your child might have RSV, consulting their healthcare provider is the best first line of defense. From here they will help you build an appropriate treatment plan for child. Keep in mind that many pediatrician offices offer 24/7 call lines.  If your child is experiencing retracted breathing (when the area between the ribs and in the neck sinks in when a person attempts to inhale), dehydration (not drinking and decrease in wet diapers) or apnea (pauses in breathing for more than 10 seconds) please call 911 or go to the closest emergency room.

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    • Salud infantil
    • Oncología pediátrica
    • Empleados
    • Atención del cáncer
    • Atención pediátrica

    Departamento destacado: Children’s Infusion Services

    Help us celebrate the holiday season by sharing joy with our Children’s Infusion Services team!  Thinking about blood can make any of us squeamish, and seeing it can be even more intimidating to the children in our lives. Being treated for a condition that requires blood transfusions or chemotherapy infusions is no easy feat, especially during the holiday season. This time of year, we are proud that we can offer our pediatric patients the power of proximity and excellence by having access to high level care close to home.  The Children’s Infusion Services (CIS) department at Renown Children’s Hospital is committed to bringing the gift of quality care to our community’s youngest patients. Whether they are caring for a child with a blood disorder or giving expert infusion care for a child battling cancer, no team does what they do better than these expert nurses, medical assistants, intake coordinators and physicians.  ‘Tis the Season to Bring Hope As the only pediatric oncology and hematology program in the region, the CIS department has a lot of responsibility on their shoulders. From inpatient chemotherapy to outpatient infusion services, this team treats a long list of pediatric blood conditions including:  Pediatric cancers Anemias Immune-mediated blood disorders Sickle-cell disease Bone marrow failure syndromes Bleeding disorders  “Our team provides a large variety of services from labs draws, sedations for procedures, infusions for diagnoses such as Crohn's disease, blood transfusions, as well as chemotherapy,” said Jen Torres, RN.  “Our team works extremely well together. We try to go above and beyond for our patients every day. It may be something as simple as a hug to comfort a parent or a special birthday gift for a patient.”  “My job allows me to work with several departments and providers when coordinating care for our littlest of patients,” added Jane Strawn, Intake Coordinator. “I assure proper authorizations are in place for the care that is needed, I communicate with our families when scheduling appointments, I organize End of Treatment Celebrations, as well as birthday shout outs and work closely with our Child Life team to help make the challenging appointment little easier.”  To best serve their patients, the team thrives on being expert multitaskers. Central line care, chemotherapy administration, blood transfusions, medication management, preventative injections, lab draws, lumbar punctures, biopsies, imaging – you name it, they do it. And they do it all with the utmost focus on safety and support.  “Our days have a lot of variation, as we perform a number of different services,” said Meagan Bertotti, RN. “We provide infusions for patients with chronic or acute medical conditions and chemotherapy/biotherapy treatment to patients undergoing cancer treatments. Overall, though, we work as a team to make these difficult procedures and treatments as easy as possible for the patients and families by providing engagement and support.”  “While we handle a lot of chemotherapy treatments for pediatric patients, we also do other infusions and transfusions as well such as blood and platelet transfusions, enzyme replacement therapies, different types of injections such as Rabies vaccine or Synagis for high-risk babies who need that extra protection during the RSV season, and lab draws,” said Chelsea Angues, RN. “We care for patients that get their therapies from outside hospitals, but the patient lives within the Reno area. We receive orders from those outside hospitals to care for those patients, so they can still be with their families and not have to travel.”  As members of the Children’s Oncology Group, a highly-regarded clinical trials group where over 90% of pediatric cancer patients across the U.S. receive treatment, teams like CIS in Renown Children’s Hospital deliver the highest standard of care. This partnership is a true testament to the devoted collaboration and relationship-building this team commits to on behalf of their patients every day.  "One of the biggest accomplishments of our team is the fact that we became a member of the Children’s Oncology Group, and the Children's Infusion Center and Pediatric Oncology became one unit,” said Shelby Nolte. "Instead of being a clinic on one side and an infusion center on the other, we really came together to make it a whole unit that collaborates on almost everything.”  “We've put much time into trying to understand other departments, their flow, their rationales and their processes so we can come to a solution that benefits our patients the greatest,” added Tiffany Macie, RN. “We've taken the last few years to really build our relationships with our pharmacy staff, our lab staff and our central supply resources. Our relationship building extends beyond the walls of the Renown building as well and out to the community providers too. In the past few years, we've been able to build relationships with the providers in the community where they trust they can send us their patients for treatment and lab draws. Finally, we've spent much time working on the relationships as a team. It's emotional work we do on our unit, and these families become our family. It's important to us that we take the time to be together outside of our shifts to enjoy one another and laugh!”  In the compassionate realm of pediatric healthcare, CIS knows that the complexities of a cancer or blood disorder diagnosis can take an emotional toll on their patients and families. The team firmly believes that emotional support can be as important as the physical and medical support throughout each patient’s unique care journey, striving to be a comforting presence during daunting times.  “The most important part of my day is collaborating with the Children's Infusion team to make life manageable for the families that are going through this experience,” added Shelby Nolte, Senior Medical Assistant. “We work as a team to make life easier for the blow of a cancer diagnosis.  We are there for our families in every way.  If they need a shoulder to cry on, an ear to listen or just someone to play cards with or tell a funny story too, we are there.”  “One of the things our team does extremely well to help our patients and their families with new diagnoses is to simply meet them where they are,” said Tiffany Macie. “That looks different for every family and every patient. We work in an environment where can build relationships with our patients and their families. This allows us the unique opportunity to really get to know them. We learn their fears, their joys, their worries, what their family lives are like, and we learn how to best meet them where they are.”  Transcending the conventional boundaries of care, the CIS department closely supports each patient, offering them solace tailored to the unique fabric of each family's life.

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    • Asthma
    • Salud infantil
    • Atención pediátrica

    Understanding and Managing Childhood Asthma

    Dr. Shipra Singh, a Pediatric Pulmonologist, outlines the challenges of diagnosing asthma in children due to symptoms resembling other respiratory issues. It's particularly difficult to identify in infants and young children, who may not clearly exhibit breathing difficulties. Asthma, often confused with bronchitis, croup, or allergies, is a significant chronic illness causing school absenteeism, as per the CDC. Risk factors include prenatal smoking and family history of allergies or asthma. Infants and toddlers are more susceptible due to smaller airways and respiratory viruses, which can exacerbate conditions like colds and bronchitis. How can I tell if my child has asthma? Unfortunately small children are unable to describe their symptoms, making asthma difficult to diagnose. Your child may even be active, playing and smiling, although they are experiencing chest tightness or labored breathing. Observe your child and let the child’s doctor know if: Your child’s breathing behavior has changed (coughing, wheezing, rapid breathing) Your child’s breathing pattern changes (day vs. night, with rest or activity, inside vs. outside) You have a family history of asthma or allergies Your child’s breathing is triggered by any foods or allergies With your help, your child’s doctor can make the best diagnosis to determine if your child has asthma. A pediatric pulmonologist (lung specialist) or pediatric allergist may also have to be consulted for special testing. Tests may include lung function testing, allergy tests, blood tests and X-rays for an accurate diagnosis. What is the treatment for infants and toddlers? Young children can use many of the same medications as older children and adults, although the way they take them and the dosage will differ. A nebulizer (or breathing machine) creating a medicated mist for your child to breathe through a mask may be used. An inhaler with a small spacer tube connected to a mask is also common to help your child breath medication into their lungs. Either of these options are effective. Asthma in children is treated with both fast-acting and long-term medicines to open up airways quickly for easy breathing and also to lessen asthma symptoms over time. Communicate with your child’s medical providers to create a personalized asthma management plan for them. How can I manage my child’s asthma? Recognize your child’s breathing habits and be aware of worsening symptoms. Consult with your child’s doctor on a daily asthma action plan to recognize worsening symptoms and track medications. Here’s an example of an asthma action plan provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Institutes of Health). Be consistent with the plan and talk to your doctor before changing it. Have an emergency plan in case of a serious asthma attack. Know where the closest ER is and know who can take care of your other children. Also know what the medical treatment coverage is under your insurance plan. Dr. Singh explains, "Discussing asthma with your child may be difficult. Some kids find the subject frightening or confusing. Others, especially the older kids, may resent the treatment and may not be interested in doing it. Talk to your doctor about advice to build an open and trusting relationship regarding your child's asthma care."

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    • Atención pediátrica
    • Atención primaria
    • Salud mental
    • Consejos de expertos

    3 Ways to Foster the Wellbeing of LGBTQIA+ Kids and Teens

    Ensuring a healthier and more inclusive future for LGBTQIA+ children and teens is of utmost importance to health systems in our community, especially Renown. Supporting the physical and mental health of youth in this community is key to those efforts, especially as they face unique challenges in terms of identity acceptance and social integration.   Dr. Caroline Barangan, Adolescent Medicine Physician with Renown Children’s Pediatric Specialty Care, discusses what you as a parent, caregiver, friend or support system can do to be a safe space for children and teens who identify as LGBTQIA+. 1.  Create a Safe Space at Home The most important action you can take for your LGBTQIA+ teen or child is to accept and support them for who they are, regardless of how they identify. “Being a teenager is already difficult enough, especially within the LGBTQIA+ community, which puts them at risk of being stigmatized, rejected and targets for bullying,” said Dr. Barangan.  Your supportive words and actions can make a huge difference as a profound expression of love and understanding. Being patient and willing to learn are the foundations to a healthy and loving relationship with your LGBTQIA+ teen or child.  2.  Encourage Regular Check-Ups with a Primary Care Provider (PCP)  Establishing your child or teen with a PCP is not only important when an illness occurs but also for annual preventative visits and regular check-ups. “A primary care provider can screen for high-risk behaviors that would put a patient’s health in jeopardy, such as sexual experience, substance use, suicidality and self-harm,” said. Dr Barangan. “These screenings are an opportunity to provide the education and support these kids and teens need to stay healthy.”  One of the main concerns LGBTQIA+ youth often have is that they will experience judgment from their provider, or the PCP will disclose sensitive information, including their sexuality or gender identity to their parents, when they are not ready to do so. Dr. Barangan emphatically reminds us that this legally cannot happen. “If a patient asks me to keep something confidential, unless they disclose that they have plans to harm themselves or others, I am legally not allowed to share that information with anyone without their permission,” said Dr. Barangan.  3.  Locate Local Resources  Northern Nevada is home to a variety of resources for the LGBTQIA+ community at large, including youth members of this community. "Finding resources to help them develop in a positive way and provide them with the information they need, whether it be in school, the household, the community or through a medical or mental health provider, is incredibly important,” said Dr. Barangan.  Below is a list of local LGBTQIA+ community resources open to you and your children:  Our Center LGBTQIA+ Health Services at Northern Nevada HOPES Northern Nevada Pride Festival & Community Parade (happens every July in Reno) Sassabration (happens every September in Carson City) Lake Tahoe Pride (events and resources shared on Facebook)

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    • Atención pediátrica
    • Medicina pulmonar y del sueño
    • Smoking

    Celebrating World Lung Day in Northern Nevada

    In the United States, electronic cigarettes are the most popular form of tobacco product used among high school students. Approximately 21% of Washoe County area high schoolers report current use of e-cigarettes, higher than the national average of 14% reported in the most recent national data. While often viewed as a safer alternative to traditional cigarette use, e-cigarette use, commonly referred to as vaping, exposes users to nicotine and harmful chemicals that stunt brain development, results in lung damage and harms overall health. In partnership with Reno area school principals and nurses, the Renown Health – UNR Med Clinical Research Office was able to provide this year’s World Lung Day Anti-Vaping Program to Galena High School, Robert McQueen High School and Sage Ridge School, reaching hundreds of high school students.

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    • Emergency Care
    • Atención pediátrica
    • Medicina del dolor, la columna vertebral y el deporte

    Head Injuries, Sprains and Broken Bones

    Participating in sports and physical activities is enjoyable and beneficial for our health. However, the risk of injuries comes with the fun and excitement of sports. Sports-related injuries, including sprains, traumatic brain injuries and broken bones, are more common than we realize and can land you in the emergency room. Dr. Scott Shepherd, Emergency Medicine Physician, provides a wealth of information. Traumatic Brain Injuries: The Invisible Threat Traumatic brain injuries come in many forms. From “mild” brain injuries, concussions, to major brain injuries and bleeds. Sometimes it is very difficult to tell the difference between a major injury and a minor injury because many of the symptoms are the same. Concussions Concussions are a type of “mild” traumatic brain injury resulting from a blow to the head or a violent shaking of the body that causes a transient alteration in mental function. They are particularly prevalent in contact sports such as football, soccer and boxing. A concussion can affect memory, judgment, reflexes, speech, balance and muscle coordination. Typically, concussions are not life threatening and usually short lived. However, multiple concussions can lead to permanent disabilities. So, remember there is nothing “mild” about injuring your brain. Contusions The more serious brain injuries from brain contusions (actual bleeding in the brain material) and bleeding that presses on the brain are life threatening. These injuries are caused by the same blow to the head as a concussion and the symptoms are the same from memory deficits, loss of coordination to coma. Because of this, anyone who has a blow to the head and is not acting normal should be evaluated by a medical professional. Anyone suspected of having a severe head injury should seek immediate medical attention and follow a strict protocol for rest and a gradual return to play. It is important to note a person may not lose consciousness if they suffer a concussion; however, major consequences can occur if not properly managed. If you suspect you have an emergency that needs immediate medical attention, please call 911 or visit an emergency room near you. While it is impossible to prevent traumatic brain injuries altogether, the severity of the injury can be mitigated through proper helmet usage and knowing your skill level when participating in high-risk activities. The guidelines for picking a helmet for summer activities such as mountain biking, dirt biking and riding off highway vehicles are similar to those of picking a helmet for winter sports. Learn more about choosing the right helmet. Any blow to your head, neck or upper body can result in a major head injury Signs to watch for include the following: Headache Dizziness Blurred vision Difficulty with thinking, attention or memory Sensitivity to noise or light Ringing in the ears Changes in hearing Double vision Changes in behavior Balance issues Nausea/vomiting   Sprains: The Annoying Twist One of the most common sports injuries is a sprain, which occurs when ligaments that connect bones are stretched or torn. Sprains typically occur in joints, such as the ankle, knee or wrist, and are often caused by sudden twists or impacts. Symptoms may include: Pain Swelling Bruising Limited range of motion Rest, ice, compression and elevation (RICE) are the initial recommended treatment, followed by physical therapy to regain strength and mobility.

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    • Salud conductual
    • Atención pediátrica
    • Atención primaria
    • Salud infantil
    • Salud mental

    Nurturing Your Child's Back-to-School Mental Health

    The back-to-school season is here, and ensuring your child's successful transition involves more than just school supplies and schedules. At Renown Children’s Hospital, and in collaboration with Nevada Pediatric Psychiatry Solutions, we understand the vital role that mental health plays in a child's overall well-being and academic performance. Below we'll guide you through essential tips for a smooth back-to-school experience, with a special focus on nurturing your child's mental health. How to Support Your Child’s Mental Health from Home Remember, the below strategies can be adapted to align with your child's personality, learning style and household dynamics. Flexibility and understanding are key in tailoring these tips to suit your child's unique needs. 1. Be Open to Communication: Recognize that effective communication is the cornerstone of understanding your child's feelings and concerns. Create a safe space where your child feels comfortable expressing their thoughts. Listen to learn, without judgment. Make it a point to validate their emotions and ensure they are heard. Encourage sharing experiences,worries, friends and challenges they may be facing. Having open conversations about sensitive topics opens the door for discussion and understanding. Make yourself available. 2. Establish a Routine: A consistent routine can offer a sense of stability and predictability for your child, and anticipation helps to decrease anxiety and establish a sense of control. Join forces and design a daily schedule that includes time for schoolwork, play, physical activity, meals and relaxation. Be flexible about the structure to allow room for last-minute changes including extra activities based on that day’s needs as well. Always add time for play and bonding. 3. Practice Compassion: Back-to-school can come with big emotions. Listening reflexively and acknowledging these feelings can help you and your child act positively on these big emotions. 4. Get Involved: Actively engage in your child's school life by participating in school events, meetings and discussions. Show interest in their educational journey, ask about their experiences and provide guidance when needed. Being present in their academic pursuits not only boosts their confidence but also strengthens the parent-child bond. 5. Use Positive Reinforcement: Celebrate your child's achievements, no matter how small they may seem. This allows for a sense of accomplishment and boosts self-esteem. Praise efforts, progress and perseverance, whether it's completing an assignment, making a new friend or overcoming a challenge. This positivity encourages a growth mindset and resilience. 6. Organize a Schoolwork Zone: Create a comfortable workspace at home dedicated to school-related tasks. Customize the area based on your child's preferences and needs. Having a designated space for studying and completing assignments promotes focus, reduces distractions and enhances their overall learning experience.

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    • Salud del bebé
    • Embarazo y parto
    • Atención pediátrica

    Importance of Safe Sleep

    In today's fast-paced society, it is understandable for parents to want to take shortcuts in caring for their little ones. A s a result, It is tempting to leave a sleeping infant in a car seat or swing after a long day of errands or when you need a moment to catch your breath. But, as convenient as these devices may be, they pose a serious risk to your child's safety. Why Car Seats and Swings Pose Risks for Infant Sleep Car seats, swings, and bouncers are quick and convenient ways to feed, hold, and sleep an infant. Not out of malice or discontent, but again from the need for quick and easy access to baby care in an already busy lifestyle. However, the risks outweigh the benefits. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) states that “infants should be moved to a crib, bassinet, or play yard for sleeping as soon as is practical.” If a parent must use a car seat or other sitting device, they should only do so for a short period of time and never as a substitute for a proper sleeping environment. Leaving a sleeping infant in a sitting device, such as a car seat or swing, can create unsafe sleeping conditions. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) warns that doing so increases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and positional asphyxia. This is because infants can easily slump over or become entangled in the straps, blocking their airway, and causing suffocation. Car seats, swings, and bouncers are quick and convenient ways to feed, hold, and sleep an infant. Not out of malice or discontent, but again from the need for quick and easy access to baby care in an already busy lifestyle. However, the risks outweigh the benefits. The AAP states: Infants should be moved to a crib, bassinet, or play yard for sleeping as soon as is practical. If a parent must use a car seat or other sitting device, they should only do so for a short period and never as a substitute for a proper sleeping environment. Leaving a sleeping infant in a sitting device, such as a car seat or swing, can create unsafe sleeping conditions. The AAP warns that doing so increases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and positional asphyxia. In addition, infants can easily slump over or become entangled in the straps, blocking their airways and causing suffocation.

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    • Parenting
    • Atención pediátrica
    • Embarazo y parto

    What Does a Doula Do?

    If you’re expecting a new baby, you may have been given the advice to hire a doula. You may have seen statistics of improved outcomes among those who’ve had a doula attend their birth. Perhaps you’ve heard that the etymology is from the Greek word meaning “to serve.” But how does a doula serve their clients? A doula is a non-medical birth professional who will guide you through labor, birth, postpartum and beyond. Your doula can discuss your options with you so you can make informed decisions, as well as provide emotional and physical support to ease your experience. While each doula offers their own style, there are certain services that most doulas will provide for their clients. Typically, a birth doula will provide at least one prenatal visit, one postpartum visit and continuous support during active labor. A postpartum doula usually provides support during the 12 weeks immediately following birth, sometimes referred to as the “fourth trimester,” but some will continue care after that as well. Simply put, a doula provides informational, physical and emotional support during the childbearing year(s). Let’s take a closer look at these three ways a doula can support you. The Basics If you don’t know your options, you don’t have any. This is a common phrase in the world of birth work. When you’re in labor, you’re exhausted, in pain and there’s often urgency inherent or implied in any choices you make. So, when an intervention is offered, many birthing people accept it without question. One method that can help the decision-making process is to check your BRAIN: Benefits: What are the benefits of the proposed intervention? Risks: What are the risks of the proposed intervention? Alternatives: What are the alternative options? Intuition: What does your intuition tell you? Nothing: What if we do nothing? What if we wait? When you’re in active labor, you might have difficulty remembering this acronym; that’s where your doula comes in. At your prenatal visits, you can ask your doula for guidance in preparing your birth plan, which can include contingencies for certain potential interventions. And as choices arise during labor, your doula can guide you through the benefits and risks and can provide you with alternative options you might not otherwise be aware of that are available to you. Your doula can remind you to check in with your intuition and can help you quiet your mind so you can listen to your instincts. The Body Although we tend to see depictions of people giving birth on their backs with their feet in stirrups, this is only one of many ways to give birth. Walking and dancing can speed up early labor. Side-lying or hands-and-knees can prevent tearing during the pushing stage. Sometimes labor stalls, and a change of position is often helpful to get things moving again. Your doula can suggest positions depending on your stage of labor. Some labor positions might require the support of another person – your doula could fill this role or assist your partner in doing so. Some doulas also provide massage or even acupressure, and most will do the “hip squeeze” that so many laboring people swear by. If your baby is presenting posterior, or “sunny side up,” your doula can apply counter pressure to alleviate back pain during labor. Some postpartum doulas will do light housework while you rest and bond with your newborn. Others might care for your baby through the night so you can catch up on sleep. Many doulas have also gone through additional training to offer breastfeeding support and may be able to assist you with latch issues and nursing positions. The Mind Pregnancy, birth and postpartum periods can be some of the most emotional times in a person’s life. A doula will hold space for you and help you process your emotions before and after birth. It’s normal to feel apprehensive, or even fearful, about labor and birth, and discussing these feelings is the first step. A doula can help you navigate your concerns in a safe space so you can be prepared emotionally for your upcoming labor. Many doulas will also guide you through writing your birth plan, which can lessen anxiety about the unknown. If you have a history of trauma, your doula can assist in communicating this, so you don’t have to relive the experience every time you meet a new medical provider. Most people will experience some form of what’s often called the Baby Blues in the immediate postpartum period. The third day after birth tends to hit hard, as hormones attempt to regulate, but the Baby Blues can continue for weeks for some new parents. A postpartum doula’s support can be incredibly valuable during this time. When the baby blues last longer than a few weeks, it could considered a mood disorder. Most doulas will recognize signs of postpartum mood disorders and will have resources available for additional support. Choosing the Best Doula for You With so many wonderful doulas in northern Nevada, you might wonder how you could ever choose just one to attend your birth. Some expectant parents are unfortunately restricted by cost. With so many expenses related to a new baby, it can be difficult to budget doula services as well. Thankfully, Nevada Medicaid now covers doula care, and some commercial insurances are following suit. Check with your insurance company to find out if they might cover part of the cost for hiring a doula. If your insurance doesn’t cover doula services, some doulas offer a sliding scale based on income. You may want to interview multiple doulas to find the right one for you. If you’re the kind of person who wants all the information you can get, a more detail-oriented doula might be the best choice. But if you tend to feel overwhelmed by too many options, you might prefer a doula who only offers additional information as the situation calls for it. If you want massage or acupressure during labor, you might want to hire a doula with those certifications. Or maybe informational and physical support are not as important to you as emotional support, in which case your best choice could be a doula who has experience with postpartum mood disorders or trauma support. Regardless of who you hire, be sure to clearly communicate your desires and expectations – not just for your birth, but also for your doula. The most important thing when choosing your doula is trusting your gut. You need to feel comfortable with your doula, as they’ll be tending to you at one of the most vulnerable times in your life. When you find a doula that you click with, who listens to you and supports your choices, you have found the best doula for you.

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    • Atención pediátrica
    • Salud del bebé
    • Salud infantil
    • Parenting

    What to Expect at a Well Child Checkup

    A well-child checkup is a great opportunity to monitor your child’s growth and development, and it's also a chance to establish a trusting relationship with your child’s pediatrician and have your questions answered. What to Expect at Each Checkup At every checkup, a comprehensive physical examination will be conducted to assess your child's growth parameters, including height, weight and head circumference. A developmental assessment will evaluate the progress of your infant or young child in achieving age-appropriate milestones, encompassing language skills, motor development, problem-solving abilities and psycho-social skills. In addition, your pediatrician will address common concerns such as feeding, sleep patterns, oral health and general infant care. Unless there are specific needs or concerns for your baby, routine laboratory tests are typically unnecessary. Your pediatrician will provide guidance on immunization schedules, post-vaccination expectations and when to seek medical attention. Furthermore, during each visit, you will receive age-specific guidance to help you anticipate your child's expected growth and development, along with essential safety precautions and illness prevention measures. Your pediatrician will discuss various topics, such as placing your baby to sleep on their back, utilizing rear-facing infant car seats until around age two, maintaining home water thermostats below 120 degrees Fahrenheit, ensuring dangerous objects and poisonous substances are out of sight and reach, emphasizing dental health and promoting the use of bike helmets, among other things. Preparing for Your Visit It is recommended that, as a parent, you write down any questions beforehand, so you don’t forget them in the moment. Most importantly, feel comfortable asking your pediatrician about anything that might seem unusual, as you are the parent, and you know best! Before leaving the pediatrician’s office, be sure that you fully understand any instructions given to you and ask for clarification if needed. From your child’s birth through young adulthood, you will be visiting your pediatrician regularly. The American Academy of Pediatrics provides what a regular schedule might look like. Well-Child Checkup Schedule Two to three days after birth and at one month Two months Four months Six months Nine months One year 15 months 18 months 24 months 30 months Three years, and yearly after

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    • Atención pediátrica
    • Salud del bebé
    • Salud infantil
    • Parenting

    10 Essential Questions to Ask at Your Child's Pediatrician Visit

    Taking a few minutes to prepare for your child's pediatrician visit helps ensure that all your child's medical needs are met. Knowing the right questions to ask your provider can help you get the most out of your visit and ensure you and your child feel comfortable and informed. It is essential to base your questions on your child's specific health needs, but the ten options below are a great place to start. How is my child's overall health and development progressing? Is my child meeting their developmental milestones, and are there any areas where they may need extra support? What vaccinations does my child need, and are they up to date on all required immunizations? Are there any nutritional recommendations or concerns for my child's age and stage of development? What are some strategies for promoting healthy habits and physical activity for my child? Are there any warning signs I should look out for regarding my child's health or behavior? What can I do to help prevent common childhood illnesses like colds, flu strains or ear infections? What should I do if my child gets sick, and when should I seek medical attention? Are there any changes to my child's medication or dosage that I should be aware of? Is there anything else I should know or be aware of regarding my child's health or development?

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    • Atención pediátrica
    • Testimonio de paciente
    • Embarazo y parto

    A Fighting Chance at 24 Weeks Sloans Story

    Most babies weigh just one pound and are roughly the size of an eggplant when they reach 24 weeks of development inside the womb. It is a crucial stage when internal organs begin functioning, and the babies' respiratory and central nervous systems are still developing.     So, in November 2021 when Kallie Johnson experienced a premature rupture of amniotic fluid around this point in her pregnancy, her care team in Winnemucca decided to transport her via Care Flight to Renown Regional Medical Center. The team at Renown Children’s Hospital immediately began discussing the risks of delivering at 24 weeks with the Johnson family.  Moving Forward with Hope Knowing the stakes, Kallie remembers never feeling rushed to decide about delivering her baby preterm. “I felt educated and supported by my care team at Renown throughout our entire stay, starting with the education they provided about what it meant to deliver my baby early,” Kallie said. “The team really helped me make the best decision for myself and my family.”    Together, Renown employees and the Johnson family moved forward with a healthy set of nerves and a powerful feeling of hope.  Weighing in at one pound 11 ounces, Sloan entered the world on Nov. 19, 2021, via emergency Cesarean section. Her birth was classified as a micro preemie because she was born before week 26 of pregnancy and so small that she fit inside the palm of her father Sterling’s hand. A full-term pregnancy is classified as reaching 39 weeks.   A Fighting Chance  Called a fighter by many Renown Children’s Hospital care team members, Sloan spent over five months in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). She was placed on a ventilator, fed through a feeding tube and monitored 24/7, overcoming daily challenges with the Renown team and her family.  As a result of being born prematurely, Sloan developed a grade one brain bleed and a congenital heart defect called patent ductus arteriosus, a persistent opening between two major blood vessels, causing too much blood to flow to the lungs and heart.   To meet the oxygen needs of her tiny lungs, Sloan was intubated and developed a severe oral aversion and high-arched palate as a result. The effects would lead to difficult developmental and physical challenges that she still conquers today. Yet, with the help of her care team – including physical, occupational and speech therapists, dieticians and doctors – Sloan continues to make progress every day.

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